Sunday, March 1, 2020

Carnival 2020 residencies

Gwladys Gambie, Maia Nunes, and Alan Vaughan/Moko Somõkõw


During January and February, during the Trinidad and Tobago Carnival season, Alice Yard hosted three artists’ residencies at Granderson Lab, which has been an important location for mas and performance practice in recent years.



Gwladys Gambie, who lives and works in Fort-de-France, Martinique, explore questions of feminism and race through the mediums of drawing, sculpture, and performance. During a two-week residency at Granderson Lab — instigated by her previous collaboration with Kristin Chen during the 2018 Caribbean Linked residency in Aruba — Gambie investigated Trinidad’s Carnival traditions and created a mas performance titled Manman Chadwon, in which she joined the mas band Moko Somõkõw on Carnival Tuesday. Photo by Maria Nunes


  
Maia Nunes is a performance artist based in Dublin, working across the disciplines of textile, original text, and sound in a live performance context. Their artistic research explores the emotional and cultural legacies of colonialism from an intercultural perspective. Their two-month residency with Alice Yard — including research trips, field recordings, and indigo dyeing — laid the artistic research foundation for a major performance work titled Crossings, a version of which will be presented by Alice Yard later in 2020. Photo by Jason Hunte



Artist and designer Alan Vaughan, based in Newcastle, has worked in Carnival masquerade for over two decades, in recent years designing and creating a series of mas bands with a group of practitioners of the traditional moko jumbie (stilt-walking) masquerade. The collaborative mas band Moko Somõkõw, founded in 2018 and based seasonally at Granderson Lab, created the presentation Resurrection at Sorrow Hill for Carnival 2020, inspired by the novel by the late Guyanese writer Wilson Harris. Photo by Maria Nunes